About Venue

Radisson Blu Resort Temple Bay Mamallapuram

57, Kovalam Road, Mamallapuram 603104. India.

Located along the East Coast Road (ECR), the Radisson Blu Resort Temple Bay Mamallapuram makes it easy to escape the bustle of Chennai for a relaxing getaway in Mahabalipuram. Our 44 acres of landscaped grounds are set right against the Bay of Bengal, inviting you to unwind and recharge with your family or loved one. For travelers who want to see the sights, attractions like the famous Shore Temple as well as other UNESCO World Heritage sites are less than a mile (less than two kilometers) from the resort. A little farther out, Pondicherry and Kanchipuram make great day-trip destinations.

Offering unparalleled views of the Bay of Bengal, the award-winning Radisson Blu Resort Temple Bay Mamallapuram is just steps from the shore. Set in 44 acres of lush, landscaped gardens, our hotel and resort provides extensive facilities for the ultimate getaway or destination event. After an unforgettable morning on the water, take a short stroll to spend an afternoon at the dramatic archaeological sites of Mamallapuram, also called Mahabalipuram.

Mahabalipuram, also known as Mamallapuram, is a town in Chengalpattu district in the southeastern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, best known for the UNESCO World Heritage Site of 7th and 8th century Hindu Group of Monuments at Mahabalipuram. It is one of the famous tourist sites in India.

Mahabalipuram was one of two major port cities in the Pallava kingdom. The town was named after Pallava king Narasimhavarman I, who was also known as Mahabali. Along with economic prosperity, it became the site of a group of royal monuments, many carved out of the living rock. These are dated to the 7th and 8th centuries: rathas (temples in the form of chariots), mandapas (cave sanctuaries), the giant open-air rock relief the Descent of the Ganges, and the Shore Temple dedicated to Shiva. The contemporary town plan was established by the British Raj in 1827.

Mahabalipuram is a small town situated in the southeastern part of Tamil Nadu, stretching between the Bay of Bengal and the Great Salt Lake. It is a renowned representative city of our rich Indian culture and heritage. It is mainly a seaport, which lies 58 km away from the capital city Chennai.

Mahabalipuram is a place that is famous for its temples and monuments, especially the very famous Shore Temple. It consists of three temples built in one single complex, that was constructed way back in the 8th century. Another famous temple is the Pancha Rathas. As the name suggests- they are a group of five temples sculpted in the form of chariots. The Descent of the Ganga is a giant rock with an open mouth in the form of sculpture.

Some other popular tourist attractions in Mahabalipuram are Arjuna’s Penance, the Crocodile Farm, the Cave temples, the Indian Seashell Museum, Krishna’s Butterball. Along with these, there are innumerable monoliths, temples and stone carvings that are a testimony to the rich cultural heritage of India.

Even though Mahabalipuram is a small town situated in the suburbs, it is well connected by buses and cars because of its immense popularity amongst Indian and even foreigners. These buses ply from different parts of Chennai, Chengal Pattu and Kanchipuram.

Mahabalipuram is also known by other names such as Mamallapattana and Mamallapuram. The term 'Mahabalipuram' means city of 'great power'. Another name by which Mahabalipuram has been known to mariners, at least since Marco Polo's time is "Seven Pagodas" alluding to the Seven Pagodas of Mahabalipuram that stood on the shore, of which one, the Shore Temple, survives.

The temples of Mahabalipuram, portraying events described in the Mahabharata, were built largely during the reigns of King Narasimhavarman and his successor Rajasimhavarman and show the movement from rock-cut architecture to structural building. The city of Mahabalipuram was founded by the Pallava king Narasimhavarman I in the 7th century AD. The mandapa or pavilions and the rathas or shrines shaped as temple chariots are hewn from the granite rock face, while the famed Shore Temple, erected half a century later, is built from dressed stone. What makes Mahabalipuram so culturally resonant are the influences it absorbs and disseminates. The Shore Temple includes many reliefs, including one 100 feet (30 m) long and 45 feet (14 m) high, carved out of granite.

The site has 40 ancient monuments and Hindu temples, including Descent of the Ganges or Arjuna's Penance – one of the largest open-air rock relief in the world. The site includes several categories of monuments: ratha temples with an architecture of monolith processional chariots built between 630 and 668 CE; the mandapa viharas with halls and stone roofs with narratives from the Mahabharata, Shaktism and Vaishnavism; rock reliefs particularly bas-reliefs of Shaivism, Shaktism and Vaishnavism; stone cut temples particularly those dedicated to Shiva that also reverentially display Vishnu and others, built between 695 and 722 CE; and, archaeological excavations with inscriptions some dated to 6th century and earlier.